Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://41.89.96.81:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/3544
Title: Adoption And Effect of Integrated Pest Management Strategy For Sppression of Mango Fruit Flies On Household Welfares in Selected Counties In Kenya
Authors: Onyimbo, Stanly Were
Keywords: Adoption And Effect of Integrated Pest Management Strategy For Sppression of Mango Fruit Flies On Household Welfares in Selected Counties In Kenya
Issue Date: May-2021
Publisher: Egerton University
Abstract: Mango production and marketing is hampered by fruit fly infestation that is responsible for high pre and post-harvest losses. To reduce the losses, cost of production and increase the profit at producer level, International Center for Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE) had developed and disseminated Integrated Pest Management strategy for suppression of mango fruit flies in selected counties in Kenya. Despite the rapid uptake of the IPM strategy, the role of socio-economic and institutional variables influencing adoption was not clear. Further, the effect of IPM strategies on the welfare of farmers was still not clear in literature. This study was conducted to fill this gap. The general objective of this study was to contribute towards improved market access and improved livelihood through enhanced adoption of IPM technologies for suppression of mango fruit flies in selected counties in Kenya. Data was collected using a semi-structured questionnaire on a sample of 660 mango farmers from Embu, Meru, Machakos and Makueni Counties. The study employed a multi-stage sampling procedure technique. STATA sofiware was used for data analysis. Descriptive statistics, multivariate Probit model, Endogenous switching regression method were used for data analysis. According to the results the means of the variables were; age of the mango farmers was 58 years, household size was Speople, years spent on education was 10, size of land was 4 acres, land under mangoes was one acre, number of trees was 52 per acre, total income per year was KES 240052.10 and total asset value of KES 5103934. Furthermore, distance to market for inputs and extension services had a mean (in walking minutes) of 99.80 and 80.65 respectively. Mango small-scale fanners who had received training on IPM technologies were 74.55%, those intercropping were 80% and those who had formed mango farming group werel8.03%. The Multivariate probit results indicate that; off-farm income, distance to nearest market for inputs, credit access and access to extension services had a positive effect on the adoption of IPM strategies opposed to age of the household head and intercropping. Group membership and the number of trees per acre had mixed results. The household size, market access, extension access and group membership reduced the time taken to adopt IPM strategies. On the other hand, the number of trees and social networks had mixed results. Farmers who combined 2-3 IPM components had a greater effect on mango output that improved the welfare of farmers’ households. There is need to invest in the provision of affordable and quality formal education, up to date, appropriate demand driven extension services and trainings that impart relevant skills that enhance the adoption of new farming technologies.
URI: http://41.89.96.81:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/3544
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Agriculture



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