Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://41.89.96.81:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/984
Title: Influence of secondary school biology teachers’ perceptions of scientific creativity and nature of science on their Classroom practices in Kajiado and Kericho Counties, Kenya.
Authors: Ndeke, Grace Catherine Wanja
Keywords: scientific creativity
Issue Date: Mar-2016
Publisher: Egerton University
Abstract: One of the major goals of Biology Education is to prepare learners to acquire both scientific and technological skills. This can be achieved by inculcating scientific creativity amongst the learners. Studies done in Kenya have indicated low levels of scientific creativity among the learners. Different approaches of inculcating creativity have been tested in Physics education in Kenya and found to be effective. Teachers have a critical role to play in the development of scientific creativity and understanding of the nature of science. Evidence in the literature suggests that minimal research has been carried out to establish the perceptions of biology teachers towards scientific creativity and the nature of science in Kenya. Therefore, this study sought to investigate biology teachers’ perceptions of scientific creativity and the nature of science and their influence on their classroom practices. The study employed descriptive cross- sectional survey design. The target population was all biology teachers’ in Kericho and Kajiado counties. There was a population of 347 biology teachers from which a sample of 205 biology teachers was selected to participate in the study. Three instruments were used for data collection: Biology Teachers’ questionnaire, Ideal Student Checklist and Biology Lesson Observation Schedule. Data on biology teachers’ perceptions ofscientific creativity, the nature of science and their classroom practices were collected using Biology Teachers’ Questionnaire. The Ideal Student Checklist was used to collect data on biology teachers’ perceptions of characteristics associated with creativity in their learners. The Biology Lesson Observation Schedule was used to collect data on the classroom practices in biology lessons. Five experts in Science Education validated the instruments. Reliability of the Biology Teachers’ Questionnaire was estimated using cronbach alpha coefficient. The reliability of Ideal Student Checklist was estimated using Kuder-Richardson 20. The instruments had reliability coefficients of 0.82 and 0.72 respectively. Data analysis involved both qualitative and quantitative techniques. The hypotheses were tested using Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient and chi-square statistics at α=0.05 level of significance. Qualitative analysis involved descriptions of biology teachers’ perceptions of scientific creativity and observed classroom practices. The findings show that biology teachers believe they understand scientific creativity. The findings also show that teachers’ explanations of creativity in the context of biology are inadequate. The findings further show that biology teachers have inadequate understanding of the nature of science. Most biology teachers believe they include classroom practices that inculcate creativity in their learners during their lessons. However, there was a disparity between what they believed they do and what actually occurs during their lessons. There was a statistically significant relationship between biology teachers’ perceptions of scientific creativity and their classroom practices. However, there was no statistically significant relationship between biology teachers’ perceptionsof the nature of science and their classroom practices. There was also a statistically significant relationship between biology teachers’ perceptionsof scientific creativity and their reaction towards characteristics associated with creativity. The findings from the study have yielded valuable information that inform secondary school biology teachers, curriculum developers, teacher 7 educators and policy makers on appropriate measures to improve teacher-education programs and design appropriate in-service training programs for practicing biology teachers
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/984
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Education and Community Studies

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